Gore ALP-X Shorts Review

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I love Gore gear, it always performs. It’s functional, well designed, and tailored for intended use. What makes great shorts compared to normal shorts for mountain biking? I think it has to start with a lot of intention. As with all Gore gear I own, every aspect of these shorts seem to be well thought out and has an emphasis on functionality.

The fit of these shorts is great. The length has the legs end at about the knee or a little lower while standing or higher when pedaling. The legs are that magical area between too tight and too baggy. They have a detachable inner great chamois, comfortable all the way through a six-hour ride. Comfort is key in a chamois, and these deliver.

They have useful normal placement pockets on both sides, something that isn’t guaranteed on every pair of shorts.

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The waist on the outer short has a zipper and button closure, it is both secure and comfortable.

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The crotch and back panels feature wind and spray protection, a feature I throughly tested while on a recent trip to the mountains of Colorado caught riding in the rain and grit. It’s hard to see how covered in water and some mud I was but under my Gore gear, I was comfortable and dry.

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These shorts have vents that can be opened or closed via zippers allowing cooling on demand. A feature that I used more than I thought I would.

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Overall I’m really happy with the shorts. Off of the bike, they are a touch longer than my ideal preference, but when riding with bent knees and sitting in the saddle, the length is pretty great. The chamois and functionality is stellar and that is the most important aspect to me. The best part is, I know they will function just as great in years to come. Gore continues to amaze me with their quality.

Full disclosure, Gore sent me these shorts to use, and try. This review, my thoughts, and opinions are as honest, unbiased, and transparent as I can possibly be.

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2015 Sufferfest Colorado Trip

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This past weekend I joined some good friends on a yearly gathering for high elevation mountain biking in Crested Butte and surrounding areas. The trip is jokingly named Sufferfest because of the long climbs at high elevation, normally between 9,000 feet and 12,000 feet. The rides get bigger as the trip goes on ending in the Kenosha to Breckenridge ride which covers about 5,000 feet of climbing in just over 30 miles. We spend four days riding famous trails over the holiday weekend. Spending time with great people, lots of climbing, lots of technical fun descents, and the beauty of Colorado.

My freshly reassembled Ibis HD3 out of the bike bag ready to hit some Colorado trails

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Day One, Dr. Park Trail – Garmin Data

The climb to the top of Dr. Park starts on a dirt road evolving into double track, and lastly single track. The creek crossing at about the half way point is cold from the melting snow but such a great aspect of the ride for me, it’s just part of the experience.

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The descent of Dr. Park starts with some technical rocks, moving on to a flow and pump section that begs for you to let go of any brakes and feel the wind in your face. The last section of the down is more arid and has larger rocks. There are some great switchbacks to drop you the last few hundred feet of the ride.

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Day Two, Hartman Rocks Trail – Garmin Data

The Hartman Rocks trail was a day of change to ride dry trail as Crested Butte had a lot of rainfall on day one. The terrain was exposed to the sky, full of smaller climbs and descents, usually with exposed large rock structures.

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Day Three, Monarch Crest Trail – Garmin Data

Riding Monarch Crest is a big day. The ride starts above 11,000 feet elevation climbs up from there. This ride beat me up last year, and I was nervous about it going into this trip. This year there were clouds on the mountain that we climbed up and through. It was a pretty neat experience.

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As the day went on the sky’s cleared and we were treated to the great views that Monarch has to offer. The trail’s climbs, descents, and views make it an all time favorite which I was able to enjoy this year without bonking. To be fair, we did bail out before the Rainbows section this year.

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In between all of these great rides were good times spent around a campfire or eating at a local restaurant. At night, we were often treated to endless stars.

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Day Four, Kenosha To Breckenridge Trail – Garmin Data

The big ride, this one had me nervous. We cross three mountain passes climbing almost 5,000 feet over the course of the 32 mile ride. The first pass we climb is Georgia Pass, a 12,000 foot peak. The climb is filled to the brim with rocks and roots making every foot of the climb work. You get above tree line at around 11,300 feet on this ride, a rewarding experience.

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The descent on the backside of Georgia Pass is filled with technical rock sections and switchbacks.

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The second climb is steep and mean, but once crested, the hardest parts of the ride were conquered. I was in a happy place once I started down the second descent. I knew I was going to finish the ride, and my goal for the trip, to ride every mile.

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The ride ends with a handful of tight switchbacks arriving in Breckenridge. Last year when I watched friends from the sideline make that final descent, I had big aspirations of being able to finish the ride in the future. This year, I did. I ended the weekend with 12,500 feet climbed at high elevation. Every switchback of the last descent felt like a victory lap of personal accomplishment. I was in a happy, but tired place.

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And with that last switchback, the trip was over. Bikes packed, planes boarded, and headed back to Illinois as I type this. Colorado is a special place and I feel privileged to have experienced a small piece of it with such good people. Another great cycling trip transitioned from great times to great memories.

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